For the Love of Iris

Articles, Tips and Notes from Schreiner's Iris Gardens

Iridaceous Pink Artistry, Iris Winter Care, and Bulbs vs Rhizomes

4 Comments

Winter Iris Care  Does your Iris bed look like this right nowbearded-iris-in-snow…. under a foot of snow? Iris beds covered in a blanket of snow need no care at this time. Let nature’s insulator do its job.

bearded-iris-bedOr maybe they look something like this….a tangled mess of decayed leaves? Well, even though it’s not an ideal sight, don’t be ashamed. Let’s talk about how to remedy the situation.

If you have a garden that boasts bare ground right about now, you most likely are also starting to see signs of spring – along with the darling and beloved daffodil, tulip and hyacinth shoots, weeds and grass blades are also emerging. Now is a good time to dote upon the forgotten Iris bed, and trim back the dead, decayed foliage. If the leaves are droopy, brownish-gray — completely lifeless — then gently tear them off at the base, like a sheet of notebook paper from its spiral. If the leaves are still sturdy and green, trim those down to below any evidence of leaf spot.

Clear away the debris from the beds, pick out the emerging weeds, if any, from the soft soil. You might spray a preventative fungicide at this point, as well. Follow all manufacture’s recommendations carefully. If you anticipate another freeze in your area, you can lay evergreen boughs or straw over your newly-cleaned out Iris beds for added protection until the spring temperatures return in earnest. At which time, you will remove any covering. Remember, rhizomes grow close to the surface and want to feel that sunshine. Bearded Iris can be very forgiving, largely due to their very sturdy nature.

Bulbs vs. RhizomesDenseClump-web

Just a short two bits on the distinction between two of the methods herbaceous perennials (including Bearded Iris) utilize for food storage…. Plants have evolved several methods of storing food so that they can spring to life when the conditions are right, bulbs and rhizomes among them. The definition of a bulb is any plant that stores its complete life cycle in an underground storage structure. The “food” is converted sunshine, collected through the leaves through photosynthesis, and carried into the “larder”. Only some of the plants commonly called bulbs actually are bulbs. Bearded Iris, although falling into the above definition, develop a storage structure known as a rhizome (really an underground “stem”). The rhizome is the larder for nutrients that give the plant the energy it needs to grow, bloom, and complete its life cycle. Trimming the Iris foliage too early deprives the plant of its food intake.  Rhizomes grow horizontally just under the surface of the soil which is why they must be planted shallowly, in soil with good drainage.

Peggy Sue with Lilies and Echinacea

Send Iris the promise of Iris…with our annual Sweetheart Iris Collection!

Celebrate the passion of Valentine’s Day all over again during Iris bloom season. Send these five radiant Tall Bearded Iris to your sweetheart, or invite them into your own heart (and garden)* with our annual  Sweetheart Iris Collection.
These five sweet beauties offer wonderful discount and a lovely array of pink, just screaming out, “Be Mine!”

Only $49.95 (plus s/h)

(*We ship our freshly dug Iris July – September)

Thank you to the following websites for the succinct information on bulbs and herbaceous perennials: http://urbanext.illinois.edu/bulbs/bulbbasics.cfm and http://healthyhomegardening.com/Blog.php?pid=105

Author: Schreiner's Iris Gardens

Dedicated to growing and selling the finest Iris in the world.

4 thoughts on “Iridaceous Pink Artistry, Iris Winter Care, and Bulbs vs Rhizomes

  1. I’ve just braved the English storms and despite the floods and the gales there are lot of healthy lime green shoots coming from the offsets on my iris .There’s a layer of decaying autumn leaves ,which i remove and then I reflect -who could believe that such beauty could come from those funny looking rhizomes -my friends call them my gingers! Some have been in the ground for about three years, some just a couple and many for just one year .

    Every summer ,the exquisite beauty of iris takes my breath away.

    My most successful of all 130 plus is Arpege,which was hybridised and introduced by you in 1966 .I love the soft lilac standards and the purple falls . it is prolific and it doesn’t fall over in the rain or need staking I’m waiting for you to bloom ,Arpege -you won’t let me down…

    Like

Share Comments & Questions

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s