For the Love of Iris

Articles, Tips and Notes from Schreiner's Iris Gardens


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By Kevin Vaughn

Amoenas and variegatas have long been favorites of iris growers. The early amoenas and variegatas were all derived from I. variegata and had many problems associated with that species, chiefly very veined hafts, and a pattern of striped falls rather than solid ones. Breeders were persistent in their work, despite poor germination of…

via Did We Give Up on the Recessive Amoenas too Early? — World of Irises


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Schreiner’s Gardens First Annual Naming Contest for Dwarf Iris

First Annual Dwarf Iris Naming Contest

Schreiner's Gardens Seedling

Seedling I8-A

This year we extend the Iris naming fun to one of our Dwarf Bearded Iris seedlings. Just as with the Tall Bearded Iris seedling, the SDB (Standard Dwarf Bearded) Iris seedling I8-A pictured above has never been introduced. It too needs a name. Won’t you join in the fun? This year’s candidate presents a bold amoena pattern of dark purple falls, edged in white, and standards of crisp white. This diminutive beauty stands just 7.5 inches tall. She blooms early in the season.

Contest open to US residents only. Entry deadline is 9:00 p.m. Pacific, Thursday, November 14, 2019.  The winner will be notified via email. Winner will receive one plant of the named Iris (shipped summer 2020) and a $25 gift certificate to Schreiner’s Iris Gardens (to be mailed to the winner along with a copy of the 2020 catalog in the spring of 2020).

Contest Rules: One name entry per person please. Suggested name must not already be registered with the American Iris Society. Any name submitted which is already registered with the American Iris Society will be discarded. You can search for registered Iris names on the AIS encyclopedia at www.irises.org. Contest open to US residents only. Prize will be shipped to a US address only. Schreiner’s Iris Gardens reserves the right to select the name from the entries received by the contest entry deadline of 9:00 p.m. (Pacific), November 14, 2019. If no suitable name is submitted, Schreiner’s Iris Gardens reserves the right to name the seedling.

Click here for the Contest Entry Form

 

The contest winner will be notified via email.

Sharing our passion for Iris,
The Schreiner Family

Images in this blog are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of the copyright holders Schreiner’s Iris Gardens.

 


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By Bryce Williamson

My second stop on the 2019 tour of iris gardens in Oregon and Washington was the garden of Keith Keppel in Salem. For many years, Keith Keppel’s garden in Stockton was a must visit destination. With his retirement from the US post office, Keith made the huge move to Salem, Oregon. While he was…

via On the Road Again: The Keppel Garden — World of Irises


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Annual Iris Naming Contest 2019

Annual Iris Naming Contest Now CLOSED

Schreiner Family Hybrid

Each October we select one of our seedlings, never before introduced, to be named by you, our fellow Iris enthusiasts. This year’s candidate presents a lively palette of color, very logically (although unimaginatively) named C843-3. This newcomer stands 35 inches tall and blooms middle of the season.

Contest open to US residents only. Entry deadline is 9:00 p.m. Pacific, Monday, October 28, 2019.  The winner will be notified via email in November 2019. Winner will receive one plant of the named Iris (shipped summer 2020) and a $25 gift certificate to Schreiner’s Iris Gardens (to be mailed to the winner along with a copy of the 2020 catalog in the spring of 2020).

Contest Rules: One name entry per person please. Suggested name must not already be registered with the American Iris Society. Any name submitted which is already registered with the American Iris Society will be discarded. You can search for registered Iris names on the AIS encyclopedia at www.irises.org. Contest open to US residents only. Prize will be shipped to a US address only. Schreiner’s Iris Gardens reserves the right to select the name from the entries received by the contest entry deadline of 9:00 p.m. (Pacific), October 28, 2019. If no suitable name is submitted, Schreiner’s Iris Gardens reserves the right to name the seedling.

Thank you to all who submitted an entry.

 

The contest winner will be notified via email.

Sharing our passion for Iris,
The Schreiner Family

Images in this blog are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of the copyright holders Schreiner’s Iris Gardens.

 


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By Sylvain Ruaud In Italy iris hybridizing is not a new activity. But as you are about to find out, over the years it has taken its own — very original — dimension. Everywhere else in Europe it is men who have dedicated their lives to irises, certainly with enthusiasm and passion, but also as a…

via THE ITALIAN LADIES — World of Irises


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By Ron Killingsworth and Patrick O’ConnorWhere, oh where, did that name originate? Iris names have always intrigued me. Some names are easy to figure out. Others defy reason. Another interesting subject is people’s names. Where in the world did the parents get the name they stuck on that poor child? Have you often wondered that? That subject…

via Louisiana Iris Names – Where did the hybridizer find that name? — World of Irises


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By Mike Unser

A selection of irises I have grown that were introduced in the year 1926. In the United States Grace Sturtevant and Bertrand Farr were working in the east, EB Williamson and the Sass Brothers in the mid-west, and Mohr and Mitchell in California. England’s own Arthur Bliss was thrilling European gardeners, as were…

via Photo Essay: Historic Varieties from 1926 — World of Irises